December 2015

Employee Error is the Leading Cause of Data Breaches

The Association of Corporate Counsel has revealed that employee error is the most common reason for a data breach in companies. Other reasons included unauthorized access by insiders attempting to steal data and phishing attacks. The largest number of breaches were found in the healthcare industry.

http://www.acc.com/aboutacc/newsroom/pressreleases/accfoundationstateofcybersecurityreportrelease.cfm

 

Data Sharing on the Cloud at high levels

Statistics compiled by cloud security vendor SkyHigh show large numbers of businesses use file-sharing solutions such as Box and Dropbox, Ben Kepes writes for ComputerWorld. Of the sample of 22 million employees working within some 500 organizations, around 39% of corporate data uploaded to the cloud is related to file-sharing applications.

For the article: http://www.computerworld.com/article/2991924/public-cloud/some-scary-for-some-statistics-around-file-sharing-usage.html

 

VTech failed to sufficiently protect passwords, in 6 million-account hack

Toymaker VTech failed to securely store its customer’s passwords, reports the BBC, citing Internet security researchers. Last month, hackers accessed 6 million children’s accounts. According to the researchers, although VTech encrypted the passwords, it failed to properly scramble to passwords and stored security questions and answers in plain text.

For the article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-35027504

 

Belgium bans Facebook use of datr cookies

A Brussels court has ordered Facebook to stop tracking people in Belgium using ‘datr’ cookies, unless those people have Facebook accounts, Peter Sayer reports for PC World. European data protection authorities want the ban to apply across the European Union. The cookie is set into the browser of anyone who visits the Facebook website, and then receives it when the browser visits any website with a Facebook social plugin. For the article:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3012283/belgian-ban-on-facebook-cookies-should-apply-to-all-of-europe-privacy-watchdogs-say.html